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Wright Robinson College

Geography

Curriculum INTENT

Our intent is to enable every Wright Robinson student to think like geographers through a curriculum that critically evaluates the world around them. To enable them to develop their own sense of place in the world in relation to different scales with an understanding that places evolve and change with time. Through the study of a wide range of contrasting places and geographical issues, students gain an understanding of how people around the world interact with their physical environment, and develop geographical skills that are slowly built upon throughout the key stage.

Curriculum End Points

The Geography department at Wright Robinson aims to ensure that all students:

 

KS3 By the end of Year 7:

 

  • Develop and apply key geographical skills, including being able to read and interpret OS maps.

 

  • Understand the different types of geography. Understand the differences and the links between human and physical geography.

 

  • Deepen their locational knowledge on a global, regional and local scale.

 

  • Have an understanding of the basic concepts of human geography, and how change impacts regions at a variety of scales.

 

  • Understand how water shapes the land around us, including coastal landscapes, fluvial systems and the impacts of weather systems.

 

  • Have secure knowledge of the physical diversity of African biomes and how human processes impact the population in African cities.

 

By the end of Year 8:

 

  • Will continue to develop their skills of describing and explaining a range of human and physical geographical processes and events.

 

  • Be able to describe patterns and trends on maps, graphs and other data presentation sources.

 

  • Explain geographical processes and evaluate geographical issues.

 

  • Develop understanding of the diverse physical and human geography of key regions throughout Asia.

 

  • Understand basic population theory and be able to evaluate population control measures used throughout the Asian continent.

 

  • Understand the impacts of climate change and investigate the future of threatened areas.

 

  • Develop a greater understanding of social and economic issues in South East Asian Rainforests and tourist destinations.

 

By the end of Year 9:

 

  • Describe a variety of maps and graphs. Students will have a strong understanding of cartographic skills which have been embedded throughout KS3.

 

  • Have a broad understanding of the factors that impact health, wellbeing and disease in the UK and on a global scale.

 

  • Understand how the UAE has changed and continues to change economically and socially.

 

  • Are able to explain the impacts of conflict from a social, economic and environmental standpoint.

 

  • Show understanding of how conflict has created a refugee crisis and the impacts this has.

 

  • Understand our changing reliance on key resources: Energy, Food and Water. Students will study global supply and demand for all three resources and investigate strategies used to develop the supply in the changing 21st Century.

 

KS4 By the end of Year 10:

 

  • Will have built on previous KS3 knowledge to apply to the GCSE specification.

 

  • Develop their understanding of natural hazards. Students will use various case study examples to apply this understanding to the world around them.

 

  • Understand and explain the processes that change the UK’s physical landscape. Including fluvial processes and landforms, and coastal processes and landforms. Students will understand the need to implement measures to protect land from natural processes.

 

  • Students will learn to carry out a fieldwork investigation and enquiry. Including the planning, implementation and evaluation of a physical geographic enquiry .

 

  • Students will study economic geography, in order to understand the processes influencing global economic development. Including the theory of economic development. Students will apply this knowledge to major case studies of contrasting locations; economic development in both Nigeria and the UK.

 

  • Students will develop GCSE exam technique, practicing a wide range of questions with relevant command words.

 

By the end of Year 11:

 

  • Students will develop their understanding of key human geographic processes. Including those specific to urban spaces. Students will study urbanisation, and the changing global trend of urbanisation. They will have the opportunity to study contrasting urban spaces to understand urban changes over time and the opportunities and challenges this can bring. Students will study the NEE city of Mumbai and the HIC city of Manchester.

 

  • Have the opportunity to further develop their fieldwork enquiry skills, by planning, implementing and evaluating a human geography fieldwork to investigate the success of the Salford Quays and MediaCity UK regeneration.

 

  • Students will be able to identify and explain the location of biomes on a global and local scale, with a focus on tropical rainforests and hot desert biomes. Students will study and the wide range of flora and fauna found within ecosystems. Students will understand the location, physical characteristics and human uses of both environments.

 

  • Show mastery of GCSE exam technique, practicing a wide range of questions with relevant command words.

KS3/4 Curriculum Map

geography learning journey.pdf

 

  Curriculum in Year 7

Students will begin by laying the geographical foundations of human and physical geography whilst learning and practicing a range of geographical skills. Students will study the following: Becoming a geographer, The UK and Europe (both physical and human geography) and Africa (both physical and human geography).

 

How we assess:

Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Overview  To understand the makeup of the British Isles and to be able to locate Manchester on a local, regional and international scale. To be able to identify areas of the UK that are densely and sparsely populated. To be able to understand why the UK is  HIC. 

Students will be assessed on their ability to describe coastal processes, and their ability to explain and evaluate coastal management techniques and flood prevention methods.

 

They will also be assessed on their explanation of the causes and effects of the  deindustrialisation of Manchester 

Students will be assessed on their ability to describe the location and characteristics of different environments within Africa. 

They will also be assessed on their ability to explain and evaluate challenges and opportunities within Kenya. 

Content
  • The continents and oceans
  • Longitude and latitude
  • Population density maps
  • The makeup of the British Isles and the location of it's major cities.
  • Understanding of basic development indicators. 

 

 

  • Processes of Erosion
  • Formation of coastal landforms
  • Causes, effects and responses to flooding in the UK
  • The causes, effects and responses of a volcanic eruption in Iceland. 
  • Causes and effects of the  deindustrialisation of Manchester. 
  • Use maps to describe the location of tropical rainforests and deserts
  • Explaining animal adaptations
  • Explaining and evaluating the opportunities and challenges of living in Kibera. 

How can parents help?

  •  Look out for any relevant geography in the news and discuss it with your child.
  •  Encourage your child to revise for key assessments. 

 

Curriculum in Year 8

Students will build on the foundations learnt in year 7 whilst studying the following topics: Journey across the USA, Asia and Russia and the Arctic Circle.

 

How we assess:

Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Overview 

Students will be assessed on their ability to use maps and graphs to describe locations and patterns.

They will be assessed on their ability to describe, explain, and evaluate human and physical geographical issues from a variety of locations around Asia.

Students will be assessed on using maps to describe  the location and characteristics of the Tundra and Taiga, and to describe the population density of Russia. 

They will be assessed on their ability to describe and explain the effects of the Chernobyl disaster, and their ability to explain why Russia is an NEE.

Students will be assessed on their description of physical geographical processes. Their explanation of geographical events and the evaluation of the impacts of migration.
Content
  • China's one child policy
  • Climate change and the Maldives
  • Deforestation in the Borneo rainforest
  • Causes and effects of the Japan Tsunami 2011. 
  • Location of Tundra and Taiga
  • Population density
  • Chernobyl
  • Development indicators.
  • Formation of waterfalls and meanders and hurricanes.
  • Explaining the impacts of hurricane Katrina
  • Evaluating the impacts of migration from mexico to the USA.

How can parents help?

  •  Encourage students to revise for key assessments
  •  Encourage students to watch the news and discuss any relevant geographical issues with them.

 

Curriculum in Year 9

Students will continue the building blocks from year 7 and 8 and will study the following topics: the geography of health, the Middle East and conflict, global ecosystems and sustainability goals. 

How we assess:

The causes and effects of the growth of Dubai

Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term

Students will be assessed on their ability to use maps and graphs to describe variations of health around the UK, and to describe patterns in the spread of diseases such as Malria and Ebola.

They will be assessed on the ability to explain why there is health inequality within the UK and around the world. 

Students will be assessed on their ability to explain the causes and consequences of the growth of Dubai, on their ability to explain the effects of the Afghanistan conflict and to evaluate the impacts of the Syrian refugee crisis.  Students will be assessed on their ability to use maps to locate the worlds ecosystems and their explanations of how people are impacting them. 
  • Health inequality within the UK
  • Diseases of poverty
  • Diseases of affluence
  • The spread of Malaria and AIDS in LIC countries. 

 

  • The growth of Dubai
  • The social, environmental and economic impacts of conflict in Afghanistan
  • The impacts of migration on Syria and Europe. 

 

  • Using maps to describe locations
  • Describing environments and explaining how animals and plants adapt to them
  • Deforestation
  • Desertification

How can parents help?

  •  Encourage them to revise for key assessments
  •  Encourage them to read about topical issues such as deforestation

 

Curriculum in year 10 and 11

At KS4 students will complete a 2 year GCSE following the AQA GCSE Geography A specification, studying geography 6 hours a fortnight.

The geography GCSE is assessed by 3 written examinations at the end of year 11, the examinations are weighted as follows.

  • Paper 1 Living with the Physical environment - 35%
  • Paper 2 Challenges with the Human environment - 35%
  • Paper 3 Geographical Applications - 30%

In year 10 students will focus on physical geography. Students start the year by studying The Challenge of Natural Hazards as part of paper 1. This will include tectonic hazards, atmospheric hazards and climate change. They continue working towards Paper 1 by studying Physical Landscapes of the UK, where they will study coastal processes and landscapes, coastal management, river processes and landforms, as well as issues of flooding in the UK. They will also complete their physical fieldwork enquiry, studying longshore drift along the north west coastline. Finally they will study The living world, where they will focus on rainforests and desert environments. 

In year 11 students work towards paper 2, challenges of the human environment. They start by studying Urban change, where they look at 2 contrasting cities, Manchester and Lagos, Nigeria, during this SOW they also complete their second piece of fieldwork where they investigate varying levels of quality of life around Manchester. Students then study Economic Change where they gain an understanding of development within the UK and Nigeria. Finally students study the challenge of resource management, where they focus on the challenge of meeting the worlds increasing demand for energy. 

 

How we assess:

Autumn Term Year 10 Spring Term Year 10 Summer Term Year 10
Overview 

Students will study the causes, effects and responses of tectonic and atmospheric hazards and climate change. They will be assessed on the following skills; describing locations, patterns and processes, and explaining and evaluating the causes, effects and responses to examples of natural hazards. 

Students will study the processes of erosion, transportation and deposition and be able to use these to explain how coastal and fluvial landforms occur. They will study coastal and river management techniques and will be assessed on their understanding and ability to evaluate these techniques. 

Students will complete their first piece of fieldwork, this is based on coasts.

 

They will also study The Challenge of Resource Management, with a focus on energy.

Content

They will be assessed on the following skills;

  • Describing locations, patterns and processes.
  • Describing the causes of natural hazards.
  • Explaining the effects of natural hazards
  • Explaining and evaluating the responses to natural hazards. 

They will be assessed on the following skills;

  • Describing geographical processes for rivers and coasts
  • Explaining and evaluating coastal management techniques
  • Explaining and evaluating flood management techniques 

They will be assessed on the following skills;

  • Risk assessments
  • Data sampling
  • Methodology
  • Data presentation
  • Methodology evaluation

 

  • Using maps and graphs to describe locations and patterns
  • The changing demand for food, water and energy in the UK
  • UK energy mix
  • Sustainable energy in Nepal
 

Autumn Term Year 11

Spring Term Year 11

Summer Term Year 11

Overview

Students will study the impacts of growth of both Manchester and Lagos, and will gain an understanding of the opportunities and challenges of living in both cities. 

 

Students will also complete their second piece of fieldwork on Manchester.

 Students will study Economic change, looking at the development of the UK and Nigeria.

 

Students will also study The Living World.

 

 

 Decision making paper. A booklet is released by AQA at the end of March. Students will them spend 6 lessons studying the contents. 

Content
  •  Using maps and graphs to describe locations and patterns
  • Urbanisation
  • Rural to urban migration
  • Manchester regeneration
  • Opportunities and challenges of the growth of Lagos
  • Lagos regeneration (Makoko)

 

  • Risk assessments
  • Data sampling
  • Methodology
  • Data presentation
  • Methodology Evaluation

 Using maps and graphs to describe locations and patterns

  • Development gap and how it can be reduced
  • Aid in Nigeria
  • TNC's in Nigeria
  • Impact of development on Nigeria.
  • The changing UK economy
  • Deindustrialisation
  • UK - North south divide
  • UK- rural changes

 

  • Locating ecosystems
  • Describing climates and how animals and plants have adapted to them.
  • Deforestation
  • Opportunities and challenges of living in deserts.
  • Desertification.

 

 

 Students are assessed on their ability to take knowledge from the 6 core units, and apply it to a new case study. 

 

How can parents help?

  •  Ensure students are interacting with the geography PiXL app
  •  Encourage students to use BBC Bitesize and revision guides
  •  Encourage students to revise for key assessments.