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Wright Robinson College

Design & Technology

Curriculum INTENT

DESIGN and TECHNOLOGY – Developing creativity. Manufacturing innovation.

Our Design and Technology curriculum ensures that students have the skills and knowledge they will need to actively engage with, contribute towards, and care for the world in which they live.

Students are encouraged to take design risks, develop creative solutions and manufacture innovative products that have a positive impact on the consumer, wider society and the environment as a whole.

 Curriculum End Points

Students will be expected to know about:

  • Materials, their origins and their properties (timber, polymer and metal)
  • Manufacturing and the use of CAD/CAM.
  • The responsibilities of a designer to consider social, moral and environmental implications.
  • Tools, equipment and safety precautions used within the workshop.
  • Drawing techniques including isometric, perspective and 3rd angle orthographic drawing.
  • Techniques for joining and shaping materials.
  • Mechanical systems used in their products which enable changes in movement and force
  • Electronic systems and how they can be used in their products

 

Students will be expected to be able to:

  • Draw and communicate ideas in 2D and 3D (including CAD and physical modelling)
  • Use a wide range of processes, tools and equipment safely, and with some accuracy.
  • Analyse relevant research materials.
  • Use CAD/CAM to improve their final outcomes.
  • Measure, marking out and cut materials with some accuracy
  • Test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users

KS4 END POINTS

Students are expected to know about:

 

  • Materials, their properties, their original source and the benefits and challenges they may have.
  • Manufacturing techniques and what technological advances are available in order to prepare for future challenges.
  • The responsibilities of a designer to consider social, moral and environmental implications.
  • The safety, suitability and quality of products for a consumer including ergonomics and anthropometrics.

 

Students will be expected to be able to:

  • Research the work of others to aid the generation of new ideas.
  • Use imagination, experimentation and combine ideas when designing
  • Develop the ability to present, justify and communicate design ideas through drawing, CAD, physical modelling and written analysis.
  • Critically test and evaluate outcomes to identify areas for improvement.
  • Apply knowledge of materials and processes to manufacture valid 3D prototypes using a range of tools, equipment and materials.
  • Apply skills in literacy, numeracy and scientific knowledge within the subject.

 Curriculum Journey

d t curriculum journey 2023 24 002 .pdf

 

Curriculum in Year 7

 How we assess:

Rotation 1

Rotation 2

Overview 

Pewter casting – After an introduction to the materials and manufacturing processes used in D+T, students will design and manufacture a pewter keyring.

This will include creating a range of possible outcomes for a chosen client, using CAD/CAM to develop a final design mold, and casting the final product.

Core Technical Principles – After an introduction to mechanical systems, students will design a range of ideas for a sustainable phone holder.

They will the manufacture the product using a range of practical skills and relevant tools.

 

Content

Theory: Materials investigation, manufacturing processes

Designing: Product analysis,

design ideas and development, CAD

Manufacturing: Cutting, filing, drilling, buffing

Theory: Investigation of levers, linkages and types of motion

Designing: Product analysis,

design ideas and development

Manufacturing: Marking out, cutting, sanding, drilling, painting

 

How can parents help?

  • Encourage your child to analyse everyday products in terms of design
  • Ask your child - 'What is that product made of, and why?'
  • Ensure your child is equipped with a pencil and an eraser

 

Curriculum in Year 8

How we assess:

Rotation 1

Rotation 2

Overview 

LED picture frame - Students will investigate different cultures to develop a range of design ideas that meet a specific client’s needs. Based on consumer feedback, students will then use C.A.D./C.A.M. and electronics to develop a final prototype.

Core Technical Principles -

After an introduction to mechanisms and types of motion, students will apply this knowledge by manufacturing a moving toy. Motion will be created by using a cam and follower system, and the toy will be personalised according to the students chosen theme.

Content

Theory: Investigating cultures, systems (electronics)

Designing: Research, specification, C.A.D. development

Manufacturing: Electronics, C.A.M. (laser cutting)

Theory: Mechanisms, types of motion, cams and followers

Designing: Product analysis, design ideas, client feedback, modelling, and product evaluation.

Manufacturing: Cutting, sanding, construction of mechanism.

 

How can parents help?

  • Encourage your child to sketch often, and in detail
  • Encourage your child to analyse everyday products in terms of design
  • Ask your child - 'What is that product made of, and why?'
  • Ensure your child is equipped with a pencil and an eraser

 

Curriculum in Year 9

 How we assess:

Rotation 1

Rotation 2

Overview 

Presentation techniques -

Formal drawing skills are introduced, to allow students to further develop and express their design ideas. These include isometric drawing, 1 and 2 point perspective drawing and 3rd angle orthographic drawing.

Manufacturing + sustainability After an introduction to the concept of being a sustainable citizen, students will use a range of sustainable materials to manufacture a bughouse. They will then use formal drawing techniques to create presentation drawings of their final product.

 

Content

Designing: Isometric drawing, design and development, C.A.D., evaluation

Theory: Ways in which we can be sustainable, as a designer and as a member of society

Manufacturing: Marking and measuring, mitre cuts, housing joints, drilling, sanding, painting

 

How can parents help?

  • Encourage your child to sketch everyday items in isometric projection
  • Ask your child - 'How is that product manufactured, and why?'
  • Ensure your child is equipped with a pencil, a ruler and an eraser

 

Curriculum in Year 10

Course title: AQA Design and Technology (8552)

How we assess:

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Overview 

Students will revisit and further develop their knowledge of specialist technical principles such as Materials, Sustainability and Manufacturing processes. This will lead onto the study of core technical principles such as CAD/CAM, Industry and Society.

Students will further embed their CAD/CAM skills by designing and manufacturing a range of personalised products. These products will then be presented through isometric sketches and CAD designs.

Students will also study further a range of core and specialist principles.

Students will complete a design portfolio based on the format of their Y11 design and make task (NEA). They will investigate a given design brief, and use the iterative process to develop a relevant, commercially viable final design proposal.

Content

Theory: Materials classifications, Manufacturing processes. Sustainability, Industry, Society, Designing for people

Designing: Isometric sketching, 3D development, CAD

Theory: Energy, Modern and Smart materials, Systems, Mechanisms, Scales of production

Designing: CAD, 3D development

Manufacturing: CAM (laser cutting)

 

Designing: Primary and secondary research, Client profile, Designing, CAD Development, Specification

Manufacturing: 3D testing and modelling, CAM (laser cutting), Construction techniques

 

How can parents help?

  • Encourage regular, detailed sketching of electronic products
  • Encourage analysis of everyday products
  • Encourage your child to revise for key assessments

Curriculum in Year 11

 Course title: AQA Design and Technology (8552)

Method of external assessment: 50% examination, 50% Non-examined Assessment

How we assess:

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Overview 

Students will complete their Non-examined Assessment portfolio (NEA). This includes detailed written investigation, a wide range of designs that meet the needs of the design brief and the client, CAD/CAM and 3D prototypes, testing and evaluation throughout and a final manufactured product.  They will also revisit a wide range of core and specialist technical principles, both within the context of their NEA, and in preparation for their external exam.

External examination preparation/revision.

Content

Investigation: Primary and secondary research, Client profile, Work of Others

Brief and Specification: Design brief and design specification written

Generating design ideas: Initial designs and client feedback

Developing design ideas: CAD modelling, 3D modelling and testing

Realising design ideas: Manufacturing of final prototype

Analysing and Evaluating: Analysis and evaluation of designs throughout the project.

Revision: Core and specialist technical principles.

Revision of core and specialist technical principles.

 

How can parents help?

  • Encourage your child to revise for key assessments
  • Help your child to find a revision method that suits their learning style
  • Ask you child to discuss and explain their NEA project  

Recommended Websites

Technology Student

Design-Technology Info

BBC Bitesize

DT Online

Additional Resources

GCSE Design and Technology students will need a pen, pencil, ruler, rubber and calculator

Design & Technology GCSE Revision Guide: Pocket Posters

Daydream Education's GCSE Design & Technology revision guide is a comprehensive learning tool that will provide all-year round support for homework, classwork and revision.